Indian Termination Policy

Indian Termination Policy

Indian termination was the policy of the United States from the mid-1940s to the mid-1960s. The belief was that Native Americans would be better off if assimilated as individuals into mainstream American society. To that end, Congress proposed to end the special relationship between tribes and the federal government. The intention was to grant Native Americans all the rights and privileges of citizenship, and to reduce their dependence on a bureaucracy whose mismanagement had been documented. In practical terms, the policy terminated the U.S. government's recognition of sovereignty of tribes, trusteeship of Indian reservations, and exclusion of Indians from state laws. Native Americans were to become subject to state and federal taxes as well as laws, from which they had previously been exempt.

Read more about Indian Termination Policy:  Process, Enabling Legislation, Special Relationship Terminations, Effects, Regaining Federal Recognition, Alaskan Natives, Repudiation

Famous quotes containing the words indian, termination and/or policy:

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