Highlands and Islands

The Highlands and Islands of Scotland are broadly the Scottish Highlands plus Orkney, Shetland and the Hebrides.

The Highlands and Islands are sometimes defined as the area to which the Crofters' Act of 1886 applied. This area consisted of the areas of seven of the counties of Scotland:

  • Argyll
  • Inverness-shire
  • Ross and Cromarty
  • Sutherland
  • Caithness
  • Orkney
  • Shetland

Highlands and Islands Enterprise (HIE) uses a broader definition also used at Eurostat's NUTS level 2, and there has been a Highlands and Islands electoral region of the Scottish Parliament since 1999.

In Highlands and Islands Fire and Rescue Service the name refers to the local government areas (council areas) of Highland, Orkney, Shetland and the Western Isles. Northern, as in Northern Constabulary, is also used to refer to this area.

The Highlands and Islands Partnership for Transport, established in 2006, covers most of the council areas of Argyll and Bute, Highland, Moray, Orkney and the Western Isles. Shetland is covered by the separate Shetland Partnership for Transport.

In the Scottish Parliament election held on 3 May 2007, the Highlands and Islands Region was the last to declare its regional votes, which were the decisive results in determining that the Scottish National Party overtook the Scottish Labour Party to obtain the largest representation in the Scottish Parliament by one seat.

Read more about Highlands And Islands:  Quote

Famous quotes containing the words highlands and, highlands and/or islands:

    Ye Highlands and ye Lawlands.
    Oh! where hae ye been?
    They hae slain the Earl of Murray,
    And hae laid him on the green.
    —Unknown. The Bonny Earl of Murray (l. 1–4)

    My heart’s in the Highlands, my heart is not here;
    My heart’s in the Highlands a-chasing the deer;
    Chasing the wild deer, and following the roe:
    My heart’s in the Highlands, wherever I go.
    Robert Burns (1759–1796)

    Consider the islands bearing the names of all the saints, bristling with forts like chestnut-burs, or Echinidæ, yet the police will not let a couple of Irishmen have a private sparring- match on one of them, as it is a government monopoly; all the great seaports are in a boxing attitude, and you must sail prudently between two tiers of stony knuckles before you come to feel the warmth of their breasts.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)