Greater Buenos Aires - Definition

Definition

The National Institute of Statistics and Censuses (Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Censos), INDEC, has defined Greater Buenos Aires to be comprised by: There are three main groups within the Buenos Aires' Conurbation. The first two groups (24 partidos) comprise the traditional conurbation, or the "conurbation proper". The third group of six partidos is in process of becoming fully integrated with the rest.

Fourteen fully urbanized partidos
  • Avellaneda
  • General San Martín
  • Hurlingham
  • Ituzaingó
  • José Clemente Paz
  • Lanús
  • Lomas de Zamora
  • Malvinas Argentinas
  • Morón
  • Quilmes
  • San Isidro
  • San Miguel
  • Tres de Febrero
  • Vicente López
Ten partidos partially urbanized
  • Almirante Brown
  • Berazategui
  • Esteban Echeverría
  • Ezeiza
  • Florencio Varela
  • La Matanza
  • Merlo
  • Moreno
  • San Fernando
  • Tigre
Six partidos not yet conurbated

As urbanization continues and the conurbation grows, six additional partially urbanized partidos now are fully connected with the conurbation:

  • Escobar
  • General Rodríguez
  • Marcos Paz
  • Pilar
  • Presidente Perón
  • San Vicente

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