Fuzzy Logic

Fuzzy logic is a form of many-valued logic or probabilistic logic; it deals with reasoning that is approximate rather than fixed and exact. In contrast with traditional logic they can have varying values, where binary sets have two-valued logic, true or false, fuzzy logic variables may have a truth value that ranges in degree between 0 and 1. Fuzzy logic has been extended to handle the concept of partial truth, where the truth value may range between completely true and completely false. Furthermore, when linguistic variables are used, these degrees may be managed by specific functions.

Fuzzy logic began with the 1965 proposal of fuzzy set theory by Lotfi A. Zadeh at the University of California, Berkeley. Fuzzy logic has been applied to many fields, from control theory to artificial intelligence.

Read more about Fuzzy Logic:  Overview, Degrees of Truth, Example, Logical Analysis, Fuzzy Databases, Comparison To Probability

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