Executive

Executive may refer to:

  • Executive (government), branch of government that has sole authority and responsibility for the daily administration of the state bureaucracy
  • Executive (senior management), senior manager in a corporation
    • Chief executive officer (CEO), one of the highest-ranking corporate officers (executives) or administrators
    • Executive director, the senior manager of an organization, company, or corporation
    • Executive education, term used for programs at graduate-level business schools that aim to give classes for managers or entrepreneurs
    • Executive officer, high-ranking member of a corporation body, government or military
    • Music executive or record executive, person within a record label who works in senior management
    • Studio executive, employee of a film studio
  • Account executive, a job title given by a number of marketing agencies to usually trainee staff, who report to account managers
  • Executive (operating system), the operating system for the ICL 290x range of computers
  • Executive car, British term that refers to a car's size and is used to describe an automobile larger than a large family car
  • Executive format, special paper size in the United States and Canada
  • Executive functions or executive system, theorized cognitive system in psychology that controls and manages other cognitive processes
  • The Executive, fictional belt-less raincoat in the American sitcom Seinfeld
  • The Executive, a passenger train of the Monon Railroad
  • The Windows Executive, internal part of modern Microsoft Windows operating systems

Famous quotes containing the word executive:

    More than ten million women march to work every morning side by side with the men. Steadily the importance of women is gaining not only in the routine tasks of industry but in executive responsibility. I include also the woman who stays at home as the guardian of the welfare of the family. She is a partner in the job and wages. Women constitute a part of our industrial achievement.
    Herbert Hoover (1874–1964)

    She isn’t harassed. She’s busy, and it’s glamorous to be busy. Indeed, the image of the on- the-go working mother is very like the glamorous image of the busy top executive. The scarcity of the working mother’s time seems like the scarcity of the top executive’s time.... The analogy between the busy working mother and the busy top executive obscures the wage gap between them at work, and their different amounts of backstage support at home.
    Arlie Hochschild (20th century)

    ... the wife of an executive would be a better wife had she been a secretary first. As a secretary, you learn to adjust to the boss’s moods. Many marriages would be happier if the wife would do that.
    Anne Bogan, U.S. executive secretary. As quoted in Working, book 1, by Studs Terkel (1973)