Essen Central Station

Essen Central Station (Essen Hauptbahnhof) is a railway station in the city of Essen in western Germany. It is situated south of the old town centre, next to the A 40 motorway. It was opened in 1862 by the Bergisch-Märkische Eisenbahn. However, the station was not the first in Essen: as the station called Essen (today Essen-Altenessen) on the Köln-Mindener Eisenbahn was opened in 1847.

The station suffered extensive damage in World War II and was almost completely rebuilt in the 1950s and 1960s. During the following years, the Essen Stadtbahn and the A 40 were other construction projects affecting the station. Today it is an important hub for local, regional and long-distance services, with all major InterCityExpress and InterCity trains calling at the station as well as RegionalExpress and Rhein-Ruhr S-Bahn services.

It has, however, fallen into disrepair, and it was proposed to move the station to the area of the current S-Bahn station of Essen West. These plans were abandoned, however, and the station is now undergoing a renovation process similar to Gelsenkirchen Hbf or Bochum Hbf.

Trains of all kinds call at the station, from long distance to local services. It used to be one of the Metropolitan stops on the Hamburg to Cologne line before the service was discontinued in 2002. There are night services by EuroNight trains to cities such as Moscow and Brussels, and DB NachtZug trains to Zurich and Vienna, among others.

Some 400 trains pass through the station each day, making Essen Hauptbahnhof the third busiest railway station in the Ruhr Area after Dortmund Hauptbahnhof and Duisburg Hauptbahnhof.

Read more about Essen Central Station:  Station Facilities, History, Services

Famous quotes containing the words central and/or station:

    Sweet weight,
    in celebration of the woman I am
    and of the soul of the woman I am
    and of the central creature and its delight
    I sing for you. I dare to live.
    Anne Sexton (1928–1974)

    When, in the course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the laws of nature and of nature’s God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.
    Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826)