Endangered Species - Impact On Biodiversity and Endangered Species

Impact On Biodiversity and Endangered Species

In order to conserve the biodiversity of the planet, one must take into consideration the reasons why so many species are becoming endangered. "Habitat loss is the most widespread cause of species endangerment in the U.S., affecting 85% of imperiled species" (Wilcove & Master, 2008, p. 416). When an animal's ecosystem is not maintained, they lose their home and are either forced to adapt to new surroundings or perish. Pollution is another factor that causes many species to become endangered. Also, over-exploitation, disease (Wilcove & Master, 2008, p. 416), and climate change (Kotiaho et al., 2005, p. 1963) have led to the endangerment of several species.

Humans have an impact on the species and their environment. "As human use of resources, energy, and space intensified over the past few centuries, the diversity of life has been substantially diminished in most parts of the world" (Ishwaran & Erdelen, 2006, p. 179).

Humans also set standards for which species they think should be saved and which species they find unimportant or undesirable. For example, the coquí frog, an invasive species in Hawaii, is so common there that its "nocturnal singing" reduces the value of homes and prevents hotels from using rooms near forests. Hawaiians have proposed eliminating the frog, and several wildlife managers want to release a pathogen to kill the frogs (Minteer & Collins, 2005, p. 333). The frog has decreased the value of homes and caused a loss of business for several hotels, so the Hawaiians decided it was acceptable to get rid of the group of coquí frog living near them.

In another example where humans affected the welfare of a species, non-native mute swans started establishing themselves at Arrowhead Lake in Vermont. When the population of swans grew to eight birds, the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department decided to take action. Two swans were eventually killed, angering animal welfare organizations and people living near the lake (Minteer & Collins, 2005, p. 333).

Yet another example of the human impact in the lives of endangered species is that of the Preble's meadow jumping mouse. Research has shown that the mouse is not taxonomically different from the Bear Lodge meadow jumping mouse and the US Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed removing the Preble's mouse from the endangered species list based on this information (Minteer & Collins, 2006, p. 333).

Read more about this topic:  Endangered Species

Famous quotes containing the words impact, endangered and/or species:

    Television does not dominate or insist, as movies do. It is not sensational, but taken for granted. Insistence would destroy it, for its message is so dire that it relies on being the background drone that counters silence. For most of us, it is something turned on and off as we would the light. It is a service, not a luxury or a thing of choice.
    David Thomson, U.S. film historian. America in the Dark: The Impact of Hollywood Films on American Culture, ch. 8, William Morrow (1977)

    While learning the language in France a young man’s morals, health and fortune are more irresistibly endangered than in any country of the universe.
    Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826)

    Both classically- and romantically-minded spirits—inasmuch as these two species always exist—occupy themselves with a vision of the future: but the former do so out of a strength of their age, the latter out of its weakness.
    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844–1900)