Critters 3 - Plot

Plot

Sometime after the events in Critters 2, Charlie MacFadden is tracking down the last of the Critters. A family of three - Annie (the main protagonist), Johnny (her little brother) and Clifford (the father) - stops at a rest stop when their car's tire pops. At the rest stop, Charlie warns them and Josh, stepson of a corrupt landlord, about the Crites. As this happens, a Crite lays eggs under the family's car and the family leaves, unknowingly taking the eggs with them.

Soon after they arrive at their tenement, the Crites hatch and attack the sleazy maintenance man, Frank. When the landlord arrives, he too is eaten by the Crites after Josh locks him in Clifford's room, unknowingly trapping his stepfather with the creatures. Next, one of the residents is attacked and wounded. Annie, her family and five others (including Josh) try to get to safety in one piece by getting to the roof of the building. Charlie arrives and destroys the remaining Critters, saving the remaining tenants. The film ends in a cliffhanger as Charlie is about to destroy two Crite eggs, but is ordered not to and a containment pod sent from the Intergalactic Council crashes into the basement. Charlie puts the eggs into the pod, but accidentally traps himself inside.

Read more about this topic:  Critters 3

Famous quotes containing the word plot:

    Persons attempting to find a motive in this narrative will be prosecuted; persons attempting to find a moral in it will be banished; persons attempting to find a plot in it will be shot.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835–1910)

    The plot was most interesting. It belonged to no particular age, people, or country, and was perhaps the more delightful on that account, as nobody’s previous information could afford the remotest glimmering of what would ever come of it.
    Charles Dickens (1812–1870)

    After I discovered the real life of mothers bore little resemblance to the plot outlined in most of the books and articles I’d read, I started relying on the expert advice of other mothers—especially those with sons a few years older than mine. This great body of knowledge is essentially an oral history, because anyone engaged in motherhood on a daily basis has no time to write an advice book about it.
    Mary Kay Blakely (20th century)