Critters 2: The Main Course - Plot

Plot

The film starts out in space on a desolate planet where human Charlie McFadden and the shapeshifting bounty hunters Ug and Lee are searching for a vicious, worm-like creature. After successfully killing the beast, they depart the planet. Soon afterwards, they receive a new assignment by Zanti, head of the High Council. He tells them that Crites (Critters or Krites) are still on earth and must be destroyed. With that, they set a course for earth. Noticing Charlie brooding, Ug inquires what's wrong. Charlie states his reluctance to going back after two years and asks, concerned, whether they would leave him there. Ug reassures him they had no such intentions.

Back on earth, Brad Brown is visiting his grandmother in Grover's Bend and word gets around the town fast implying he became well known after the events of the first film. Shortly after the bounty hunters arrive the Crites begin terrorizing the town. They begin to grow in large numbers. Lee, Ug's partner, is killed and devoured by the Critters, causing Ug to slip into a deep depression and revert back to his alien form. The remaining people of the town devise a plot.

They lead the Critters to a burger shop in an attempt to blow them up but fail. The Crites then come together into a large ball and begin heading to the church. The Crites then devour a man dressed as the Easter Bunny. Just before they reach the church, Charlie flies directly into them with Ug's spaceship, seemingly destroying the Critters and sacrificing himself. Ug then takes on Charlie's facial feature in honor of his bravery. It is later revealed the next day as Bradly begins to depart that Charlie survived by using a parachute and stays on earth, becoming sheriff of the town. Ug departs in a new spacecraft, still wearing the guise of Charlie.

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