Cord

Cord may refer to:

  • String or rope
  • Cord (sewing), a trimming made of multiple strands of yarn twisted together
  • Cord Automobile, a former American car marque founded by Errett Lobban Cord
  • Cord (unit), a unit of measurement for firewood used in North America
  • Vibrating string
  • In electronics, a cable
    • A power cord or extension cord
  • Cord (band), a British rock group
  • Cord (film), a 2000 film starring Daryl Hannah and Jennifer Tilly
  • Alex Cord, an actor and writer
  • Canadian Organization for Rare Disorders, a non-profit health organization
Biology
  • Spinal cord
  • Mycelial cord, a structure, used by fungi to transfer nutrients over larger distances.
  • Umbilical cord, a tube that connects a developing embryo or fetus to its placenta
  • Chronic obstructive respiratory disease, an alternate name for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Famous quotes containing the word cord:

    one is in a shoe factory cursing the machine,
    one is at the aquarium tending a seal,
    one is dull at the wheel of her Ford,
    one is at the toll gate collecting,
    one is tying the cord of a calf in Arizona,
    one is straddling a cello in Russia....
    Anne Sexton (1928–1974)

    Two are better than one; because they have a good reward for their labour. For if they fall, the one will lift up his fellow: but woe to him that is alone when he falleth; for he hath not another to help him up. Again, if two lie together, then they have heat: but how can one be warm alone? And if one prevail against him, two shall withstand him; and a threefold cord is not quickly broken.
    Bible: Hebrew Ecclesiastes 4:9-12.

    Ah! How neatly tied, in these people, is the umbilical cord of morality! Since they left their mothers they have never sinned, have they? They are apostles, they are the descendants of priests; one can only wonder from what source they draw their indignation, and above all how much they have pocketed to do this, and in any case what it has done for them.
    Antonin Artaud (1896–1948)