Comparative Statics - Comparative Statics With Constraints

Comparative Statics With Constraints

A generalization of the above method allows the optimization problem to include a set of constraints. This leads to the general envelope theorem. Applications include determining changes in Marshallian demand in response to changes in price or wage.

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Famous quotes containing the words comparative and/or constraints:

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