Charles B. Rangel - Political Positions

Political Positions

Various advocacy groups have given Rangel scores or grades as to how well his votes align with the positions of each group. Overall, as of 2003, Rangel had an average lifetime 91 percent "Liberal Quotient" from Americans for Democratic Action. In contrast, the American Conservative Union assessed to Rangel a lifetime rating of less than 4 percent through 2009. National Journal rates congressional votes as liberal or conservative on the political spectrum, in three policy areas: economic, social, and foreign. For 2005–2006, Rangel's averages were as follows: economic rating 91 percent liberal and 6 percent conservative, social rating 94 percent liberal and 5 percent conservative, and foreign rating 84 percent liberal and 14 percent conservative.

Project Vote Smart provides the ratings of many, many lesser known interest groups with respect to Rangel. Rangel typically has 100 ratings from NARAL Pro-Choice America and Planned Parenthood and, inversely, 0 ratings or close to that from the National Right to Life Committee. He has typically gotten very high ratings, in the 90s or 100, from the American Civil Liberties Union, the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. The League of Conservation Voters has usually given Rangel around a 90 rating. Taxpayers for Common Sense has given Rangel ratings in the middling 40–50 range, while the National Taxpayers Union has typically given Rangel very low ratings, or an 'F' grade.

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