Castillo de San Marcos - Confederate States Period

Confederate States Period

See also: St. Augustine in the American Civil War

In January 1861, Florida seceded from the United States in the opening months of the American Civil War. Union troops had withdrawn from the fort, leaving only one man behind as caretaker. In January 1861, Confederate troops marched on the fort. The Union soldier manning the fort refused to surrender it unless he was given a receipt for it from the Confederacy. He was given the receipt and the fort was taken by the Confederacy without a shot. Most of the artillery in the fort was sent to other forts, leaving only five cannons in the water battery to defend the fort.

The Saint Augustine Blues a militia unit formed in St Augustine were enrolled into the Confederate Army at Ft. Marion on August 5, 1861. They were assigned to the recently organized Third Florida Infantry as its Company B. More than a dozen former members of the St. Augustine Blues are buried in a row at the city's Tolomato Cemetery.

The fort along with the rest of the city of St Augustine was reoccupied by Union troops after acting mayor Cristobal Bravo officially surrendered the city to Union Navy fleet commander C.R.P Rodgers on March 11, 1862. The Confederate forces left the city the previous evening in anticipation of the arrival of the Union fleet under the command of Commodore Dupont.

Read more about this topic:  Castillo De San Marcos

Famous quotes containing the words confederate states, confederate, states and/or period:

    Figure a man’s only good for one oath at a time. I took mine to the Confederate States of America.
    Frank S. Nugent (1908–1965)

    Figure a man’s only good for one oath at a time. I took mine to the Confederate States of America.
    Frank S. Nugent (1908–1965)

    I make this direct statement to the American people that there is far less chance of the United States getting into war, if we do all we can now to support the nations defending themselves against attack by the Axis than if we acquiesce in their defeat, submit tamely to an Axis victory, and wait our turn to be the object of attack in another war later on.
    Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882–1945)

    There is a period in the history of the individual, as of the race, when the hunters are the “best men,” as the Algonquins called them.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)