Capital Punishment in New Zealand

Capital punishment in New Zealand first appeared in a codified form when New Zealand became a British territory in 1840, and was first employed in 1842. It was last used in 1957, abolished for murder in 1961, and abolished altogether, including for treason, in 1989. During the period that it was in effect, 85 people were executed.

Read more about Capital Punishment In New Zealand:  Method, History, Abolition: 1949–1961, Abolition and Its Aftermath: 1961 Onwards

Famous quotes containing the words capital punishment, capital, punishment and/or zealand:

    Many of us do not believe in capital punishment, because thus society takes from a man what society cannot give.
    Katharine Fullerton Gerould (1879–1944)

    Oh, a capital ship for an ocean trip,
    Was the Walloping Window Blind;
    No gale that blew dismayed her crew
    Or troubled the captain’s mind.
    Charles Edward Carryl (1841–1920)

    Let us have compassion for those under chastisement. Alas, who are we ourselves? Who am I and who are you? Whence do we come and is it quite certain that we did nothing before we were born? This earth is not without some resemblance to a gaol. Who knows but that man is a victim of divine justice? Look closely at life. It is so constituted that one senses punishment everywhere.
    Victor Hugo (1802–1885)

    Teasing is universal. Anthropologists have found the same fundamental patterns of teasing among New Zealand aborigine children and inner-city kids on the playgrounds of Philadelphia.
    Lawrence Kutner (20th century)