Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press is the publishing business of the University of Cambridge. Granted letters patent by Henry VIII in 1534, it is the world's oldest publishing house, and the second largest university press in the world. It also publishes bibles and academic journals.

The Press’s mission is to “To further through publication the University’s objective of advancing learning, knowledge and research worldwide.” This mission is laid out in ‘Statute J’ in the University of Cambridge’s Statutes and Ordinances. The Press's objective is "To operate sustainably for the public benefit a publishing programme that upholds the integrity of the Cambridge name."

Cambridge University Press is both an academic and educational publisher. It has more than 50 offices all around the globe, employs 2,000 people, and publishes over 45,000 titles by authors from 100 countries. Its publishing includes professional books, textbooks, monographs, reference works, over 300 academic journals, Bibles and prayer books, English language teaching publications, educational software, and electronic publishing. As a department of a charity, Cambridge University Press is exempt from income tax and corporate tax in most countries, but may pay sales and other commercial taxes on its products. In the financial year of 2012, its revenue was £245m; the Press transfers a part of its annual surplus back to the University.

Read more about Cambridge University Press:  Governance, Electronic and Digital Developments, History, Community Work

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    Like dreaming, reading performs the prodigious task of carrying us off to other worlds. But reading is not dreaming because books, unlike dreams, are subject to our will: they envelop us in alternative realities only because we give them explicit permission to do so. Books are the dreams we would most like to have, and, like dreams, they have the power to change consciousness, turning sadness to laughter and anxious introspection to the relaxed contemplation of some other time and place.
    Victor Null, South African educator, psychologist. Lost in a Book: The Psychology of Reading for Pleasure, introduction, Yale University Press (1988)

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    Donald M. Lowe, U.S. historian, educator. History of Bourgeois Perception, ch. 4, University of Chicago Press (1982)