Blind Date (1987 Film) - Plot

Plot

Walter Davis (Willis) allows his brother, Ted (Phil Hartman), to set him up on a blind date with his wife's cousin, Nadia (Basinger).

Nadia is shy and the two experience some awkwardness. However, as the evening goes on, Nadia begins to drink and behave in a wild manner. (A warning about her behavior under the influence of alcohol had been given by Ted but disregarded by Walter, thinking it was a joke.)

To make matters worse, Nadia's jealous ex-boyfriend, David (John Larroquette), exacerbates the situation by stalking the couple all night.

Walter ends up driven insane by Nadia's mishaps, wreaking havoc at a party and getting arrested after menacing David with a mugger's revolver. He even forces David to do a moonwalk before firing at the frightened man's feet.

Nadia posts $10,000 in bail and agrees to marry David if he will help Walter avoid prison time. Before the wedding, Walter gives Nadia chocolates filled with brandy. Walter attempts to stop the wedding. Chaos ensues.

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