Benjamin Harrison Home

The Benjamin Harrison Home, in the Old Northside Historic District of Indianapolis, Indiana, was the home of the Twenty-third President of the United States, Benjamin Harrison. Benjamin Harrison had the house built in the 1870s of red brick, and it had sixteen rooms. It was from the front porch of the house that Benjamin Harrison instituted his famous Front Porch Campaign in the 1888 United States Presidential Campaign, often speaking to crowds on the street. In 1896, Harrison renovated the house and added electricity. Benjamin Harrison died there in a second story bedroom in 1901. Today it is owned by the Arthur Jordan Foundation and operated as a museum to Benjamin Harrison by the Benjamin Harrison Foundation.

Read more about Benjamin Harrison HomeHistory, Structure, Today

Other articles related to "harrison, benjamin, benjamin harrison home, benjamin harrison":

United States Presidential Nominating Conventions - Lists of Political Party Conventions - Major Party Conventions
... William Henry Harrison in 1836, George C ... (Whig) William Henry Harrison 1844 Baltimore James K ... Blaine Indianapolis (Greenback) Benjamin F ...
United States Congressional Delegations From Missouri - House of Representatives
... (D-R) 23rd (1833–1835) John Bull 24th (1835–1837) Albert Galliton Harrison (D) 25th (1837–1839) John Miller (D) 26th (1839–1841) John Jameson (D) 27th (1841–1843) John C ... King Benjamin F ... Benjamin (R) George W ...
Benjamin Harrison Home - Today
... all decorated in the Victorian style typical of Benjamin Harrison's time at the residence. 3,700 pieces of memorabilia actually belonged to Benjamin Harrison and his family, and the books in the museum number 2,440 ... Besides archive regarding Benjamin Harrison, the house also features archives of the Daughters of the American Revolution ...

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