Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology

Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (Bengali: বাংলাদেশ প্রকৌশল বিশ্ববিদ্যালয় Bangladesh Prokoushol Bishshobiddalôe) or BUET as it is commonly known, is a Public Engineering University in Bangladesh. It is the oldest Engineering institution in the region.

Every year, about 1000 students get enrolled in undergraduate and postgraduate programs to study engineering, architecture, planning and science in this institution. In undergraduate admission test, only about top 17% students can get admitted among 6,000 selected candidates. The total number of teachers is about 500. The University has continued to expand over the last three decades. This includes the construction of new academic buildings, auditorium complex, halls of residence. As of 2012, BUET ranked 269 in the world in Engineering & Technology in the QS World University Rankings

Read more about Bangladesh University Of Engineering And Technology:  History, Awards, Distinguished Alumni

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