Attachment in Children

Attachment in children is a theory of attachment between children and their caregivers specifically addressing the behaviors and emotions that children direct toward familiar adults. It is primarily an evolutionary and ethological theory postulating that infants seek proximity to a specified attachment figure in situations of distress or alarm for the purpose of survival.

Attachment in childhood can also be described as the considerable closeness a child feels to an authority figure. It also describes the function of availability, which is the degree to which the authoritative figure is responsive to the child's needs and shares communication with them. Childhood attachment can define characteristics that will shape the child’s sense of self and how they carry out relationships with others.

Attachment theory has led to a new understanding of child development. Children develop different styles of attachment based on experiences and interactions with their caregivers at a young age. Four different attachment styles or patterns have been identified in children: secure attachment, anxious-ambivalent attachment, anxious-avoidant attachment, and disorganized attachment. Attachment theory has become the dominant theory used today in the study of infant and toddler behavior and in the fields of infant mental health, treatment of children, and related fields. Infants at a young age can be affected by many internal and external factors, leading to a specific attachment pattern later in life.

Read more about Attachment In Children:  Attachment Theory and Children, Attachment Classification in Children: The Strange Situation Protocol, Attachment Patterns, Criticism

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