Attachment

Attachment may refer to:

  • Attachment theory, the psychological theory which is used to describe and investigate the predictable emotional connection between individuals
  • "Attachment" as a vice:
    • Upādāna, a cause of suffering (in Buddhism)
    • Moh, a vice in Sikh belief
Law
  • Attachment (law), a means of collecting a legal judgment by levying on property in the possession of a third party
    • Attachment of earnings, collecting money owed by a debtor directly from the debtor's employer
Technology
  • An e-mail attachment
  • AT Attachment, a computer disk drive interface standard
  • The binding of a virus to its target cell
  • Precision attachment, the functional mechanical parts of a removable partial denture
  • Rental attachments, components attached to rental machinery
  • Excavator#Excavator_attachments added onto construction equipment to alter its function
  • Attachments (TV series), a BBC comedy-drama that ran from 2000 to 2002 about an Internet startup company

Famous quotes containing the word attachment:

    The English, besides being “good haters,” are dogged and downright, and have no salvos for their self-love. Their vanity does not heal the wounds made in their pride. The French, on the contrary, are soon reconciled to fate, and so enamoured of their own idea, that nothing can put them out of conceit with it. Whatever their attachment to their country, to liberty or glory, they are not so affected by the loss of these as to make any desperate effort or sacrifice to recover them.
    William Hazlitt (1778–1830)

    Fiction is like a spider’s web, attached ever so lightly perhaps, but still attached to life at all four corners. Often the attachment is scarcely perceptible.
    Virginia Woolf (1882–1941)

    Men are more evanescent than pictures, yet one sorrows for lost friends, and pictures are my friends. I have none others. I am never long enough with men to attach myself to them; and whatever feelings of attachment I have are to material things.
    John Ruskin (1819–1900)