Atomistic Market

Atomistic Market

In economic theory, perfect competition (sometimes called pure competition) describes markets such that no participants are large enough to have the market power to set the price of a homogeneous product. Because the conditions for perfect competition are strict, there are few if any perfectly competitive markets. Still, buyers and sellers in some auction-type markets, say for commodities or some financial assets, may approximate the concept. Perfect competition serves as a benchmark against which to measure real-life and imperfectly competitive markets.

Read more about Atomistic Market:  Basic Structural Characteristics, Approaches and Conditions, Results, The Shutdown Point, Short-run Supply Curve, Examples, Criticisms, Equilibrium in Perfect Competition

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