Art Deco

Art Deco (/ˌɑrt ˈdɛkoʊ/), or Deco, is an influential visual arts design style which first appeared in France during the 1920s, flourished internationally during the 30s and 40s, then waned in the post-World War II era. It is an eclectic style that combines traditional craft motifs with Machine Age imagery and materials. The style is often characterized by rich colors, bold geometric shapes and lavish ornamentation.

Deco emerged from the Interwar period when rapid industrialization was transforming culture. One of its major attributes is an embrace of technology. This distinguishes Deco from the organic motifs favored by its predecessor Art Nouveau.

Historian Bevis Hillier defined Art Deco as "an assertively modern style... ran to symmetry rather than asymmetry, and to the rectilinear rather than the curvilinear; it responded to the demands of the machine and of new material... the requirements of mass production."

During its heyday Art Deco represented luxury, glamour, exuberance, and faith in social and technological progress.

Read more about Art Deco:  Etymology, Origins, Attributes, Influence, Streamline Moderne, Gallery

Famous quotes containing the word art:

    Sweet Benjamin, since thou art young,
    And hast not yet the use of tongue,
    Make it thy slave, while thou art free;
    Imprison it, lest it do thee.
    John Hoskyns (1566–1638)