Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis - History

History

Timeline
Year Event
1824 Charles Bell writes a report about ALS.
1850 English scientist Augustus Waller describes the appearance of shriveled nerve fibers
1869 French doctor Jean-Martin Charcot first describes ALS in scientific literature
1881 "Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis" is translated into English and published in a three-volume edition of Lectures on the Diseases of the Nervous System
1939 ALS becomes a cause célèbre in the United States when baseball legend Lou Gehrig's career—and, two years later, his life—is ended by the disease. He gives his farewell speech on 4 July 1939.
1950s ALS epidemic occurs among the Chamorro people on Guam
1991 Researchers link chromosome 21 to FALS (Familial ALS)
1993 SOD1 gene on chromosome 21 found to play a role in some cases of FALS
1996 Rilutek becomes the first FDA-approved drug for ALS
1998 The El Escorial criteria is developed as the standard for classifying ALS patient in clinical research
1999 The revised ALS Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-R) is published and soon becomes a gold standard measure for rating decline in ALS patient in clinical research
2011 Noncoding repeat expansions in C9ORF72 are found to be a major cause of ALS and frontotemporal dementia

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