American Association of Lutheran Churches

American Association Of Lutheran Churches

The American Association of Lutheran Churches (TAALC, also known as The AALC) is an American Lutheran church body. It was formed on November 7, 1987 as an alternative choice for churches in The American Lutheran Church (ALC) denomination who did not want to be part of the merger with two other Lutheran church bodies, Lutheran Church in America (LCA) and the Association of Evangelical Lutheran Churches (AELC), which formed the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. The AALC offices were located in Bloomington, Minnesota. The national office moved to Fort Wayne, Indiana in 2007. It had 70 congregations, with about 16,000 members, in 2008. Its current President is the Rev. Franklin E. Hays.

Read more about American Association Of Lutheran Churches:  Historical Background, Fellowship With The Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod, Basic Beliefs of The AALC, Presidents

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