Accounting Information System

An accounting information system (AIS) is a system of collection, storage and processing of financial and accounting data that is used by decision makers. An accounting information system is generally a computer-based method for tracking accounting activity in conjunction with information technology resources. The resulting statistical reports can be used internally by management or externally by other interested parties including investors, creditors and tax authorities. The actual physical devices and systems that allows the AIS to operate and perform its functions

  1. Internal controls and security measures: what is implemented to safeguard the data
  2. Model Base Management

Read more about Accounting Information System:  History, Software Architecture of A Modern AIS, Advantages and Implications of AIS, How To Effectively Implement AIS

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