A Feast For Crows - Characters

Characters

The story is narrated from the point of view of 12 characters and, as with previous volumes, a one-off prologue point of view of a relatively minor character.

  • Prologue: Pate, a novice of the Citadel in Oldtown
  • Cersei Lannister, The Queen Regent
  • Ser Jaime Lannister, Lord Commander of the Kingsguard
  • Brienne, Maid of Tarth, a young warrior woman searching for Sansa and Arya Stark
  • Sansa Stark, pretending to be Petyr Baelish's bastard daughter "Alayne Stone" (by which name her later chapters are known)
  • Arya Stark, later referred to as "Cat of the Canals", beginning her training by the House of Black and White (The Faceless Men)
  • Samwell Tarly, a sworn brother of the Night's Watch
  • In the Iron Islands:
    • The Prophet, The Drowned Man: Prince Aeron "Damphair" Greyjoy, One of King Balon's three brothers
    • The Kraken's Daughter: Princess Asha Greyjoy, daughter of King Balon of the Iron Islands
    • The Iron Captain, The Reaver: Prince Victarion Greyjoy, One of King Balon's three brothers
  • In Dorne:
    • The Captain of Guards: Areo Hotah, Captain of the Guards to Prince Doran Martell of Dorne
    • The Soiled Knight: Ser Arys Oakheart of the Kingsguard
    • The Queenmaker, The Princess in the Tower: Arianne Martell, daughter of Prince Doran

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Famous quotes containing the word characters:

    His leanings were strictly lyrical, descriptions of nature and emotions came to him with surprising facility, but on the other hand he had a lot of trouble with routine items, such as, for instance, the opening and closing of doors, or shaking hands when there were numerous characters in a room, and one person or two persons saluted many people.
    Vladimir Nabokov (1899–1977)

    I have often noticed that after I had bestowed on the characters of my novels some treasured item of my past, it would pine away in the artificial world where I had so abruptly placed it.
    Vladimir Nabokov (1899–1977)

    What makes literature interesting is that it does not survive its translation. The characters in a novel are made out of the sentences. That’s what their substance is.
    Jonathan Miller (b. 1936)