4th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Heavy Artillery

4th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Heavy Artillery

The 4th Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Heavy Artillery was a unit that served in the Union Army during the latter part of the American Civil War. It was formed from former Unattached Companies of Heavy Artillery raised by Massachusetts to serve the state and for the defenses of Washington, D.C..

Read more about 4th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Heavy Artillery:  History, Complement, References

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    We had an inspection today of the brigade. The Twenty-third was pronounced the crack regiment in appearance, ... [but] I could see only six to ten in a company of the old men. They all smiled as I rode by. But as I passed away I couldn’t help dropping a few natural tears. I felt as I did when I saw them mustered in at Camp Chase.
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