Works and Days

The Works and Days (Ancient Greek: Ἔργα καὶ Ἡμέραι, Erga kai Hēmerai) is a didactic poem of some 800 verses written by the ancient Greek poet Hesiod around 700 BC. At its center, the Works and Days is a farmer's almanac in which Hesiod instructs his brother Perses in the agricultural arts. Scholars have seen this work against a background of agrarian crisis in mainland Greece, which inspired a wave of colonial expeditions in search of new land. In the poem Hesiod also offers his brother extensive moralizing advice on how he should live his life. The Works and Days is perhaps best known for its two mythological aetiologies for the toil and pain that define the human condition: the story of Prometheus and Pandora, and the so-called Myth of Five Ages.

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Works And Days - Select Editions and Translations - Translations
... (1983), Hesiod Theogony, Works and days, Shield, Baltimore, ISBN 0-8018-2998-4 ... (1993), Hesiod Works Days, Theogony, Indianapoli, ISBN 0-87220-179-1 ... (1996), Works and Days a translation and commentary for the social sciences, Berkeley, ISBN 0-520-20383-6 Most, G.W ...

Famous quotes containing the words works and, days and/or works:

    ‘Tis too plain that with the material power the moral progress has not kept pace. It appears that we have not made a judicious investment. Works and days were offered us, and we took works.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    Alice: I put swimsuits in boxes six days a week.
    George: Yeah. What about Sunday? Maybe then you put yourself in a swimsuit.
    Alice: Oh, not me.
    George: Why? You don’t look good in a swimsuit?
    Alice: Sure I do. I can’t swim.
    George: You’re kidding.
    Alice: I never learned. I was even scared of the duck pond when I was a kid.
    Michael Wilson (1914–1978)

    Every man is in a state of conflict, owing to his attempt to reconcile himself and his relationship with life to his conception of harmony. This conflict makes his soul a battlefield, where the forces that wish this reconciliation fight those that do not and reject the alternative solutions they offer. Works of art are attempts to fight out this conflict in the imaginative world.
    Rebecca West (1892–1983)