Works and Days

The Works and Days (Ancient Greek: Ἔργα καὶ Ἡμέραι, Erga kai Hēmerai) is a didactic poem of some 800 verses written by the ancient Greek poet Hesiod around 700 BC. At its center, the Works and Days is a farmer's almanac in which Hesiod instructs his brother Perses in the agricultural arts. Scholars have seen this work against a background of agrarian crisis in mainland Greece, which inspired a wave of colonial expeditions in search of new land. In the poem Hesiod also offers his brother extensive moralizing advice on how he should live his life. The Works and Days is perhaps best known for its two mythological aetiologies for the toil and pain that define the human condition: the story of Prometheus and Pandora, and the so-called Myth of Five Ages.

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Works And Days - Select Editions and Translations - Translations
... (1983), Hesiod Theogony, Works and days, Shield, Baltimore, ISBN 0-8018-2998-4 ... (1993), Hesiod Works Days, Theogony, Indianapoli, ISBN 0-87220-179-1 ... (1996), Works and Days a translation and commentary for the social sciences, Berkeley, ISBN 0-520-20383-6 Most, G.W ...

Famous quotes containing the words works and, days and/or works:

    He never works and never bathes, and yet he appears well fed always.... Well, what does he live on then?
    Edward T. Lowe, and Frank Strayer. Sauer (William V. Mong)

    In a few days I’ll have lived one score and three days in this vale of tears. On I plod—always bored, often drunk, doing no penance for my faults—rather do I become more tolerant of myself from day to day, hardening my crystal heart with blasphemous humor and shunning only toothpicks, pathos, and poverty as being the three unforgivable things in life.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896–1940)

    Only the more uncompromising of the mystics still seek for knowledge in a silent land of absolute intuition, where the intellect finally lays down its conceptual tools, and rests from its pragmatic labors, while its works do not follow it, but are simply forgotten, and are as if they never had been.
    Josiah Royce (1855–1916)