Willa Cather

Willa Cather

Willa Sibert Cather (December 7, 1873 – April 24, 1947) was an American author who achieved recognition for her novels of frontier life on the Great Plains, in works such as O Pioneers!, My Ántonia, and The Song of the Lark. In 1923 she was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for One of Ours (1922), a novel set during World War I. Cather grew up in Nebraska and graduated from the University of Nebraska. She lived and worked in Pittsburgh for ten years, then at the age of 33 she moved to New York, where she lived for the rest of her life.

Read more about Willa CatherEarly Life and Education, Career, Personal Life, Writing Influences, Legacy and Honors

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Famous quotes by willa cather:

    Where there is great love there are always miracles.
    Willa Cather (1873–1947)

    The history of every country begins in the heart of a man or a woman.
    Willa Cather (1876–1947)

    From the time the Englishman’s bones harden into bones at all, he makes his skeleton a flagstaff, and he early plants his feet like one who is to walk the world and the decks of all the seas.
    Willa Cather (1876–1947)

    Whatever we had missed, we possessed together the precious, the incommunicable past.
    Willa Cather (1873–1947)

    Men are all right for friends, but as soon as you marry them they turn into cranky old fathers, even the wild ones. They begin to tell you what’s sensible and what’s foolish, and want you to stick at home all the time. I prefer to be foolish when I feel like it, and be accountable to nobody.
    Willa Cather (1873–1947)