Who is Willa Cather?

Willa Cather

Willa Sibert Cather (December 7, 1873 – April 24, 1947) was an American author who achieved recognition for her novels of frontier life on the Great Plains, in works such as O Pioneers!, My Ántonia, and The Song of the Lark. In 1923 she was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for One of Ours (1922), a novel set during World War I. Cather grew up in Nebraska and graduated from the University of Nebraska. She lived and worked in Pittsburgh for ten years, then at the age of 33 she moved to New York, where she lived for the rest of her life.

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Some articles on Willa Cather:

Willa Cather - Bibliography - Collections
1936, essays) The Old Beauty and Others (1948, three stories) Willa Cather On Writing (1949, essays) Five Stories (1956, published by the Estate of Willa Cather) This does not include recent collections of ...
List Of Fictional Literature Featuring Opera - Authors C
... Carew The Contralto John Stewart Carter Full Fathom Five Willa Cather The Song of the Lark Willa Cather Lucy Gayheart Willa Cather A Wagner Matinee Frances Cavanah Two Loves for Jenny Lind Rodolfo Celletti Tu ...
Willa Cather Birthplace
... The Willa Cather Birthplace, also known as the Rachel E ... County, Virginia, where the Pulitzer Prize-winning author Willa Cather was born in 1873 ... Cather's maternal grandmother Rachel E ...

Famous quotes containing the words willa cather, cather and/or willa:

    “Jim,” she said earnestly, “if I was put down there in the middle of the night, I could find my way all over that little town; and along the river to the next town, where my grandmother lived. My feet remember all the little paths through the woods, and where the big roots stick out to trip you. I ain’t never forgot my own country.”
    Willa Cather (1873–1947)

    The windy springs and the blazing summers, one after another, had enriched and mellowed that flat tableland; all the human effort that had gone into it was coming back in long, sweeping lines of fertility. The changes seemed beautiful and harmonious to me; it was like watching the growth of a great man or of a great idea. I recognized every tree and sandbank and rugged draw. I found that I remembered the conformation of the land as one remembers the modelling of human faces.
    —Willa Cather (1873–1947)

    Write about winter in the summer. Describe Norway as Ibsen did, from a desk in Italy; describe Dublin as James Joyce did, from a desk in Paris. Willa Cather wrote her prairie novels in New York City; Mark Twain wrote Huckleberry Finn in Hartford, Connecticut. Recently, scholars learned that Walt Whitman rarely left his room.
    Annie Dillard (b. 1945)