Who is Thomas Hobbes?

  • (noun): English materialist and political philosopher who advocated absolute sovereignty as the only kind of government that could resolve problems caused by the selfishness of human beings (1588-1679).
    Synonyms: Hobbes

Thomas Hobbes

Thomas Hobbes of Malmesbury (5 April 1588 – 4 December 1679), in some older texts Thomas Hobbs of Malmsbury, was an English philosopher, best known today for his work on political philosophy. His 1651 book Leviathan established the foundation for most of Western political philosophy from the perspective of social contract theory.

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Some articles on Thomas Hobbes:

John Milton's Relationships - Literary - Thomas Hobbes
... There is little known about a direct relationship, if there was any, between Milton and Thomas Hobbes except for one passage from John Aubrey's Minutes of the Life of Mr ... Hobbes was not one of his acquaintances, that her husband did not like him at all, but he would acknowledge him to be a man of great parts, and a learned man ... To Marjorie Nicolson, Milton spent his life combating and counteracting the philosophy of Hobbes, an individual that he believed was "The Atheist and Arch Heretic" ...
Jerusalem (Mendelssohn) - Moses Mendelssohn's Treatise “On Religious Power” and Its Composition - The Philosophical Issue (First Part) - The Natural Condition of Man Is Intolerance (Thomas Hobbes)
... In Thomas Hobbes' Leviathan the argument that the fear of God also committed the state as an inferior power, was borrowed from a theological tradition which was also very common in ... Mendelssohn obviously used Hobbes’ moral philosophy to address the present conditions in the French and the Habsburg Monarchy and its Roman Catholic constitution, but his main address was probably Prussia and its “p ... But Mendelssohn’s “triumph” over Hobbes did not mean that Hobbes’ condition of human nature was not important for his own political theory ...

Famous quotes containing the words hobbes and/or thomas:

    Long before Einstein told us that matter is energy, Machiavelli and Hobbes and other modern political philosophers defined man as a lump of matter whose most politically relevant attribute is a form of energy called “self-interestedness.” This was not a portrait of man “warts and all.” It was all wart.
    George F. Will (b. 1941)

    Under the heavens that know not what years be
    The men, the beasts, the trees, the implements
    Uttered even what they will in times far hence—
    All of us gone out of the reach of change—
    Immortal in a picture of an old grange.
    —Edward Thomas (1878–1917)