Who is Stefan Zweig?

  • (noun): Austrian writer (1881-1942).
    Synonyms: Zweig

Stefan Zweig

Stefan Zweig (; November 28, 1881 – February 22, 1942) was an Austrian novelist, playwright, journalist and biographer. At the height of his literary career, in the 1920s and 1930s, he was one of the most famous writers in the world.

Read more about Stefan Zweig.

Some articles on Stefan Zweig:

Books On Stefan Zweig
... Elizabeth Allday, Stefan Zweig A Critical Biography, J ... Stefan and Lotte Zweig's South American Letters New York, Argentina and Brazil, 1940-42 ... Alberto Dines, Morte no Paraíso, a Tragédia de Stefan Zweig, Editora Nova Fronteira 1981, (rev ...
New York Review Books - Titles in The NYRB Classics Series
... by Robert Walser Between the Woods and the Water by Patrick Leigh Fermor Beware of Pity by Stefan Zweig The Big Clock by Kenneth Fearing Black Sun The Brief Transit and Violent Eclipse of Harry Crosby by ... Cassandra at the Wedding by Dorothy Baker Chaos and Night by Henry de Montherlant Chess Story by Stefan Zweig The Child by Jules Vallès The Chrysalids by John Wyndham Clandestine ... Lovecraft The Complete Fiction by Francis Wyndham Confusion by Stefan Zweig Conquered City by Victor Serge Contempt by Alberto Moravia Conundrum by Jan Morris Corrigan by Caroline ...
Richard Strauss - Life and Works - Works - Opera
... Die schweigsame Frau (1934), was composed with Stefan Zweig as librettist Friedenstag (1935–6) and Daphne (1937) both had a libretto by Joseph Gregor and Stefan Zweig ... (1942), had a libretto by Clemens Krauss, although the genesis for it came from Stefan Zweig and Joseph Gregor ...
Austrian Holocaust Memorial Award - Presentations
... consulate in Rio de Janeiro for his effort to establish Casa Stefan Zweig, a museum devoted to Stefan Zweig in Petropolis, and his book Morte no paraíso, a tragédia de ...

Famous quotes containing the words stefan zweig and/or zweig:

    But nothing is better than a truth which appears not to have the semblance of truth. There is always something incomprehensible about the great heroic deeds performed by humanity because they rise so far beyond the mediocre measure of mere mortals; but it is always only because of the incredible feats that human beings have accomplished that humanity recovers its faith in itself.
    Stefan Zweig (18811942)

    As nature requires whirlwinds and cyclones to release its excessive force in a violent revolt against its own existence, so the spirit requires a demonic human being from time to time whose excessive strength rebels against the community of thought and the monotony of morality ... only by looking at those beyond its limits does humanity come to know its own utmost limits.
    —Stefan Zweig (18811942)