Who is Rutherford Birchard Hayes?

  • (noun): 19th President of the United States; his administration removed federal troops from the South and so ended the Reconstruction Period (1822-1893).
    Synonyms: Hayes, Rutherford B. Hayes, President Hayes

Famous quotes containing the words rutherford birchard hayes, rutherford birchard, birchard hayes, hayes and/or birchard:

    Any officer fit for duty who at this crisis would abandon his post to electioneer for a seat in Congress ought to be scalped.
    Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822–1893)

    There is no assurance of the great fact in question [namely, immortality]. All the arguments are mere probabilities, analogies, fancies, whims. We believe, or disbelieve, or are in doubt according to our own make-up—to accidents, to education, to environment. For myself, I do not reach either faith or belief ... that I—the conscious person talking to you—will meet you in the world beyond—you being yourself a conscious person—the same person now reading what I say.
    Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822–1893)

    The general review of the past tends to satisfy me with my political life. No man, I suppose, ever came up to his ideal. The first half [of] my political life was first to resist the increase of slavery and secondly to destroy it.... The second half of my political life has been to rebuild, and to get rid of the despotic and corrupting tendencies and the animosities of the war, and other legacies of slavery.
    —Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822–1893)

    The debt was the most sacred obligation incurred during the war. It was by no means the largest in amount. We do not haggle with those who lent us money. We should not with those who gave health and blood and life. If doors are opened to fraud, contrive to close them. But don’t deny the obligation, or scold at its performance.
    —Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822–1893)

    Every age has its temptations, its weaknesses, its dangers. Ours is in the line of the snobbish and the sordid.
    —Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822–1893)