Who is Marshall McLuhan?

Marshall McLuhan

Herbert Marshall McLuhan, CC (July 21, 1911 – December 31, 1980) was a Canadian philosopher of communication theory. His work is viewed as one of the cornerstones of the study of media theory, as well as having practical applications in the advertising and television industries.

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Some articles on Marshall McLuhan:

Marshall McLuhan - Legacy
... After the publication of Understanding Media, McLuhan received an astonishing amount of publicity, making him perhaps the most publicized English ... profits to fund their practice of "genius scouting." Much enamoured with McLuhan's work, Feigen and Gossage arranged for McLuhan to meet with editors of several major ... reports that, as a direct consequence of these meetings, McLuhan was offered the use of an office in the headquarters of both Time and Newsweek, any ...
Marshall Mc Luhan Bibliography - Articles
... Hook reviewed by Herbert Marshall McLuhan ... Edmund Carpenter and Marshall McLuhan ... Marshall McLuhan and Barrington Nevitt ...
Canada Post Millennium Stamps - February 2000 - The Millennium Collection, Canada's Great Thinkers
... Marshall McLuhan Edmonton-born Marshall McLuhan remains a cultural icon as Canada's pioneer pop philosopher and oracle of the electronic age ... Designed by Stacey Zabolotney and based on an illustration by Stephanie Carter 17 February 2000 Marshall McLuhan The Man with a Message 46 cents Ashton-Potter Canada Ltd ...

Famous quotes containing the words marshall mcluhan, mcluhan and/or marshall:

    Ideally, advertising aims at the goal of a programmed harmony among all human impulses and aspirations and endeavors. Using handicraft methods, it stretches out toward the ultimate electronic goal of a collective consciousness.
    Marshall McLuhan (1911–1980)

    Primitivism has become the vulgar cliché of much modern art and speculation.
    —Marshall McLuhan (1911–1980)

    Work is a responsibility most adults assume, a burden at times, a complication, but also a challenge that, like children, requires enormous energy and that holds the potential for qualitative, as well as quantitative, rewards. Isn’t this the only constructive perspective for women who have no choice but to work? And isn’t it a more healthy attitude for women writhing with guilt because they choose to compound the challenges of motherhood with work they enjoy?
    —Melinda M. Marshall (20th century)