Who is letty cottin pogrebin?

Letty Cottin Pogrebin

Letty Cottin Pogrebin (born June 9, 1939) is an American author, journalist, nationally-known lecturer, and social justice activist. Her tenth book, How to Be A Friend to A Friend Who’s Sick, will be published in April, 2013.

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Letty Cottin Pogrebin - Personal Life
... Letty Cottin Pogrebin has been married since 1963 to Bertrand B ... Pogrebin, an attorney specializing in Labor and Employment Law ... They have three grown children – Abigail Pogrebin an author, Robin Pogrebin, a New York Times reporter who covers culture, and David Pogrebin, who works in the restaurant and ...

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    Like plowing, housework makes the ground ready for the germination of family life. The kids will not invite a teacher home if beer cans litter the living room. The family isn’t likely to have breakfast together if somebody didn’t remember to buy eggs, milk, or muffins. Housework maintains an orderly setting in which family life can flourish.
    Letty Cottin Pogrebin (20th century)

    Much is made of the accelerating brutality of young people’s crimes, but rarely does our concern for dangerous children translate into concern for children in danger. We fail to make the connection between the use of force on children themselves, and violent antisocial behavior, or the connection between watching father batter mother and the child deducing a link between violence and masculinity.
    Letty Cottin Pogrebin (20th century)

    If family violence teaches children that might makes right at home, how will we hope to cure the futile impulse to solve worldly conflicts with force?
    —Letty Cottin Pogrebin (20th century)

    Much is made of the accelerating brutality of young people’s crimes, but rarely does our concern for dangerous children translate into concern for children in danger. We fail to make the connection between the use of force on children themselves, and violent antisocial behavior, or the connection between watching father batter mother and the child deducing a link between violence and masculinity.
    —Letty Cottin Pogrebin (20th century)

    Compared to other parents, remarried parents seem more desirous of their child’s approval, more alert to the child’s emotional state, and more sensitive in their parent-child relations. Perhaps this is the result of heightened empathy for the child’s suffering, perhaps it is a guilt reaction; in either case, it gives the child a potent weapon—the power to disrupt the new household and come between parent and the new spouse.
    —Letty Cottin Pogrebin (20th century)