Who is Horace Walpole?

Horace Walpole

Horatio Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford (24 September 1717 – 2 March 1797) was an English art historian, man of letters, antiquarian and Whig politician. He is now largely remembered for Strawberry Hill, the home he built in Twickenham, south-west London where he revived the Gothic style some decades before his Victorian successors, and for his Gothic novel, The Castle of Otranto. Along with the book, his literary reputation rests on his Letters, which are of significant social and political interest. He was the son of Sir Robert Walpole, and cousin of the 1st Viscount Nelson.

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Marie Anne De Vichy-Chamrond, Marquise Du Deffand
... Madame du Deffand is said by Horace Walpole (in a letter to Thomas Gray) to have been for a short time the mistress of the regent, the duke of Orléans ... were with the duchesse de Choiseul and with Horace Walpole, the latter becoming the strongest and longest-lasting of all her attachments ... Walpole refused at first to acknowledge the closeness of their intimacy from an exaggerated fear of the ridicule attaching to her age, but he paid several visits to Paris expressly for the ...
Horace Walpole - Formal Styles From Birth To Death
... Mr Horace Walpole (1717–1741) Mr Horace Walpole, MP (1741–1742) The Hon ... Horace Walpole, MP (1742–1768) The Hon ... Horace Walpole (1768–1791) The Rt Hon ...
John Astley (painter) - Career As Painter
... Horace Walpole claimed Astley's prominence was based "on the peculiarity of his good fortune, rather than by his exertions as an artist..." and added that "his estimated his profession only by his ... banking heir Tyringham Backwell (1754 — 1777), painted prior to 1777 To Sir Horace Mann, 1st Baronet, an Astley admirer and subject, Horace Walpole wrote of a visit ... who became the artist's second wife Sir Thomas Sebright, 5th baronet Sir Horace Mann (the 1751 pastel portrait was owned by Horace Walpole) Marcus Beresford ...

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    Cunning is neither the consequence of sense, nor does it give sense. A proof that it is not sense, is that cunning people never imagine that others can see through them. It is the consequence of weakness.
    Horace Walpole (1717–1797)

    The next Augustan age will dawn on the other side of the Atlantic. There will, perhaps, be a Thucydides at Boston, a Xenophon at New York, and, in time, a Virgil at Mexico, and a Newton at Peru. At last, some curious traveller from Lima will visit England and give a description of the ruins of St. Paul’s, like the editions of Balbec and Palmyra.
    —Horace Walpole (1717–1797)

    I am Roman, alas, because Horace is Roman.
    Pierre Corneille (1606–1684)