Who is Frances Wright?

  • (noun): United States early feminist (born in Scotland) (1795-1852).
    Synonyms: Wright, Fanny Wright

Frances Wright

Frances Wright (September 6, 1795 – December 13, 1852) also widely known as Fanny Wright, was a Scottish-born lecturer, writer, freethinker, feminist, abolitionist, and social reformer, who became a U. S. citizen in 1825. That year she founded the Nashoba Commune in Tennessee as a utopian community to prepare slaves for emancipation, intending to create an egalitarian place, but it lasted only three years. Her Views of Society and Manners in America (1821) brought her the most attention as a critique of the new nation.

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Frances Wright - United States
... Wright traveled to the United States in 1818 at the age of 23, and with her younger sister toured the country for two years before returning to Scotland ... Along with Robert Owen, Wright demanded that the government offer free boarding schools ... what the utopian socialist Charles Fourier had said in France, "that the progress of civilization depended on the progress of women." Wright was the co-f ...

Famous quotes containing the words frances wright and/or wright:

    ... the condition of women affords, in all countries, the best criterion by which to judge the character of men.
    Frances Wright (1795–1852)

    Jesus would recommend you to pass the first day of the week rather otherwise than you pass it now, and to seek some other mode of bettering the morals of the community than by constraining each other to look grave on a Sunday, and to consider yourselves more virtuous in proportion to the idleness in which you pass one day in seven.
    —Frances Wright (1795–1852)