Who is Frances Wright?

  • (noun): United States early feminist (born in Scotland) (1795-1852).
    Synonyms: Wright, Fanny Wright

Frances Wright

Frances Wright (September 6, 1795 – December 13, 1852) also widely known as Fanny Wright, was a Scottish-born lecturer, writer, freethinker, feminist, abolitionist, and social reformer, who became a U. S. citizen in 1825. That year she founded the Nashoba Commune in Tennessee as a utopian community to prepare slaves for emancipation, intending to create an egalitarian place, but it lasted only three years. Her Views of Society and Manners in America (1821) brought her the most attention as a critique of the new nation.

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Frances Wright - United States
... Wright traveled to the United States in 1818 at the age of 23, and with her younger sister toured the country for two years before returning to Scotland ... Along with Robert Owen, Wright demanded that the government offer free boarding schools ... through her projects in America what the utopian socialist Charles Fourier had said in France, "that the progress of civilization depended on the progress of ...

Famous quotes containing the words frances wright and/or wright:

    ... it would be impossible for women to stand in higher estimation than they do here. The deference that is paid to them at all times and in all places has often occasioned me as much surprise as pleasure.
    Frances Wright (1795–1852)

    ... we have broken down the self-respecting spirit of man with nursery tales and priestly threats, and we dare to assert, that in proportion as we have prostrated our understanding and degraded our nature, we have exhibited virtue, wisdom, and happiness, in our words, our actions, and our lives!
    —Frances Wright (1795–1852)