Who is Frances Wright?

  • (noun): United States early feminist (born in Scotland) (1795-1852).
    Synonyms: Wright, Fanny Wright

Frances Wright

Frances Wright (September 6, 1795 – December 13, 1852) also widely known as Fanny Wright, was a Scottish-born lecturer, writer, freethinker, feminist, abolitionist, and social reformer, who became a U. S. citizen in 1825. That year she founded the Nashoba Commune in Tennessee as a utopian community to prepare slaves for emancipation, intending to create an egalitarian place, but it lasted only three years. Her Views of Society and Manners in America (1821) brought her the most attention as a critique of the new nation.

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Frances Wright - United States
... Wright traveled to the United States in 1818 at the age of 23, and with her younger sister toured the country for two years before returning to Scotland ... Along with Robert Owen, Wright demanded that the government offer free boarding schools ... the utopian socialist Charles Fourier had said in France, "that the progress of civilization depended on the progress of women." Wright was the co-founder of the Free ...

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    Opinions are not to be learned by rote, like the letters of an alphabet, or the words of a dictionary. They are conclusions to be formed, and formed by each individual in the sacred and free citadel of the mind, and there enshrined beyond the arm of law to reach, or force to shake; ay! and beyond the right of impertinent curiosity to violate, or presumptuous arrogance to threaten.
    Frances Wright (1795–1852)

    The professional celebrity, male and female, is the crowning result of the star system of a society that makes a fetish of competition. In America, this system is carried to the point where a man who can knock a small white ball into a series of holes in the ground with more efficiency than anyone else thereby gains social access to the President of the United States.
    —C. Wright Mills (1916–1962)