Who is Dante Gabriel Rossetti?

  • (noun): English poet and painter who was a leader of the Pre-Raphaelites (1828-1882).
    Synonyms: Rossetti

Dante Gabriel Rossetti

Dante Gabriel Rossetti (12 May 1828 – 9 April 1882) was an English poet, illustrator, painter and translator. He founded the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood in 1848 with William Holman Hunt and John Everett Millais, and was later to be the main inspiration for a second generation of artists and writers influenced by the movement, most notably William Morris and Edward Burne-Jones. His work also influenced the European Symbolists and was a major precursor of the Aesthetic movement.

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Some articles on Dante Gabriel Rossetti:

William Morris - The Kelmscott Press - Publications
... Tyre, The History of Godefrey of Boloyne (1893) Sir Thomas More, Utopia (1893) Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Sonnets and Lyrical Poems (1893) Dante Gabriel Rossetti ...
List Of Pre-Raphaelite Paintings - PRB Members - Dante Gabriel Rossetti
... See List of paintings by Dante Gabriel Rossetti. ...

Famous quotes containing the words dante gabriel rossetti, dante gabriel, gabriel rossetti, rossetti, dante and/or gabriel:

    So Spring comes merry towards me here, but earns
    No answering smile from me, whose life is twin’d
    With the dead boughs that winter still must bind,
    Dante Gabriel Rossetti (1828–1882)

    So Spring comes merry towards me here, but earns
    No answering smile from me, whose life is twin’d
    With the dead boughs that winter still must bind,
    Dante Gabriel Rossetti (1828–1882)

    I have been here before,
    But when or how I cannot tell:
    I know the grass beyond the door,
    The sweet keen smell,
    The sighing sound, the lights around the shore.
    —Dante Gabriel Rossetti (1828–1882)

    A Sonnet is a moment’s monument,—
    Memorial from the Soul’s eternity
    To one dead deathless hour.
    —Dante Gabriel Rossetti (1828–1882)

    His character as one of the fathers of the English language would alone make his works important, even those which have little poetical merit. He was as simple as Wordsworth in preferring his homely but vigorous Saxon tongue, when it was neglected by the court, and had not yet attained to the dignity of a literature, and rendered a similar service to his country to that which Dante rendered to Italy.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    I have been here before,
    But when or how I cannot tell:
    I know the grass beyond the door,
    The sweet keen smell,
    The sighing sound, the lights around the shore.
    —Dante Gabriel Rossetti (1828–1882)