Who is Dame Edith Sitwell?

Some articles on dame edith sitwell:

James Purdy - Biography - Literary Criticism With Views On Obstacles To Wider Acceptance
... In the beginning of her assessment of him, Dame Edith Sitwell felt he was always writing the black experience without necessarily mentioning race ... Now this brevity of conveying a fullness and richness of experience in what Dame Edith Sitwell called a "marrow of form" has almost become a necessary standard ... Dame Edith Sitwell had recognized this when she stated that Purdy ”has enormous variety" ...

Famous quotes containing the words dame edith sitwell, dame edith, edith sitwell, sitwell, dame and/or edith:

    Our hearts seemed safe in our breasts and sang to the
    Light—
    The marrow in the bone
    We dreamed was safe . . . the blood in the veins, the
    sap in the tree
    Were springs of Deity.
    Dame Edith Sitwell (1887–1964)

    The last faint spark
    In the self-murdered heart, the wounds of the sad uncomprehending
    dark,
    The wounds of the baited bear,—
    The blind and weeping bear whom the keepers beat
    On his helpless flesh . . . the tears of the hunted hare.
    Dame Edith Sitwell (1887–1964)

    The ghost of the heart of manred Cain
    And the more murderous brain
    Of Man, still redder Nero that conceived the death
    Of his mother Earth, and tore
    Her womb, to know the place where he was conceived.
    —Dame Edith Sitwell (1887–1964)

    The last faint spark
    In the self-murdered heart, the wounds of the sad uncomprehending
    dark,
    The wounds of the baited bear,—
    The blind and weeping bear whom the keepers beat
    On his helpless flesh . . . the tears of the hunted hare.
    —Dame Edith Sitwell (1887–1964)

    Come dame or maid, be not afraid,
    Poor Tom will injure nothing.
    —Unknown. Tom o’ Bedlam’s Song (l. 11–12)

    Still falls the Rain—
    Dark as the world of man, black as our loss—
    Blind as the nineteen hundred and forty nails
    Upon the Cross.
    —Dame Edith Sitwell (1887–1964)