Who is camille paglia?

Camille Paglia

Camille Anna Paglia (/ˈpɑːliə/; born April 2, 1947) is an American author, teacher, and social critic. Paglia, a self-described dissident feminist, has been a professor at The University of the Arts in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania since 1984. She wrote Sexual Personae: Art and Decadence from Nefertiti to Emily Dickinson (1990), a best-selling work of literary criticism, among other books and essays. She also wrote an analysis of Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds, and Break, Blow, Burn on poetry. She writes articles on art, popular culture, feminism, and politics. Paglia has celebrated Madonna and taken radical libertarian positions on controversial social issues such as abortion, homosexuality and drug use. She is known as a critic of American feminism, and is also strongly critical of the influence of French writers such as Jacques Lacan, Jacques Derrida, and Michel Foucault.

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Camille Paglia - Works
... Classics) (1998) ISBN 0-851-70651-7 Break, Blow, Burn Camille Paglia Reads Forty-three of the World's Best Poems (2005) ISBN 0-375-42084-3 Glittering Images A ...

Famous quotes containing the words camille paglia, paglia and/or camille:

    Male urination really is a kind of accomplishment, an arc of transcendance. A woman merely waters the ground she stands on.
    Camille Paglia (b. 1947)

    French rhetorical models are too narrow for the English tradition. Most pernicious of French imports is the notion that there is no person behind a text. Is there anything more affected, aggressive, and relentlessly concrete than a Parisan intellectual behind his/her turgid text? The Parisian is a provincial when he pretends to speak for the universe.
    —Camille Paglia (b. 1947)

    The old-fashioned idea that the simple piling up of experiences, one on top of another, can make you an artist, is, of course, so much rubbish. If acting were just a matter of experience, then any busy harlot could make Garbo’s Camille pale.
    Helen Hayes (1900–1993)