Who is camille paglia?

Camille Paglia

Camille Anna Paglia (/ˈpɑːliə/; born April 2, 1947) is an American author, teacher, and social critic. Paglia, a self-described dissident feminist, has been a professor at The University of the Arts in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania since 1984. She wrote Sexual Personae: Art and Decadence from Nefertiti to Emily Dickinson (1990), a best-selling work of literary criticism, among other books and essays. She also wrote an analysis of Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds, and Break, Blow, Burn on poetry. She writes articles on art, popular culture, feminism, and politics. Paglia has celebrated Madonna and taken radical libertarian positions on controversial social issues such as abortion, homosexuality and drug use. She is known as a critic of American feminism, and is also strongly critical of the influence of French writers such as Jacques Lacan, Jacques Derrida, and Michel Foucault.

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Camille Paglia - Works
... Classics) (1998) ISBN 0-851-70651-7 Break, Blow, Burn Camille Paglia Reads Forty-three of the World's Best Poems (2005) ISBN 0-375-42084-3 Glittering ...

Famous quotes containing the words camille paglia, paglia and/or camille:

    When anything goes, it’s women who lose.
    Camille Paglia (b. 1947)

    The 1990s, after the reign of terror of academic vandalism, will be a decade of restoration: restoration of meaning, value, beauty, pleasure, and emotion to art and restoration of art to its audience.
    —Camille Paglia (b. 1947)

    The old-fashioned idea that the simple piling up of experiences, one on top of another, can make you an artist, is, of course, so much rubbish. If acting were just a matter of experience, then any busy harlot could make Garbo’s Camille pale.
    Helen Hayes (1900–1993)