Who is Alexander Pope?

  • (noun): English poet and satirist (1688-1744).
    Synonyms: Pope

Alexander Pope

Alexander Pope (21 May 1688 – 30 May 1744) was an 18th-century English poet, best known for his satirical verse and for his translation of Homer. Famous for his use of the heroic couplet, he is the third-most frequently quoted writer in The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, after Shakespeare and Tennyson.

Read more about Alexander Pope.

Some articles on Alexander Pope:

Alexander Pope - Works - Editions
... The Works of Alexander Pope vol 3 vol 3 v 9 of 10 v 6 of 8. ...
The Distrest Poet - Picture - Alexander Pope
... The scene shown in The Distrest Poet was probably inspired by Alexander Pope's satirical poem The Dunciad, most likely by the prefatory matter of the second version, the Dunciad Variorum ... early states of the print included a quotation from Pope's work The bill stuck to the wall above the poet's head originally featured a reference to Pope ... appears to have been entirely invented by Hogarth rather than copied from a real bill) of Pope clashing with Edmund Curll over the unauthorised publication of the poet's correspondence ...
Chrononhotonthologos - Political Satire
... or an anti-Walpolean, and he identified with Alexander Pope, in particular, in his stance on the 18th century's cultural polemic (see Augustan poetry for the issues behind Ambrose Philips and Alexander Pope ... Pope had been a consistent enemy of Ambrose Philips's, and Philips was a stand-in for an entire slate of Whig political views ... The friends and admirers of Gay (including Alexander Pope and Henry Carey) regarded this political game as a personal and moral betrayal ...
Alexander Pope (disambiguation)
... Alexander Pope (1688–1744) was an English poet ... Alexander Pope may also refer to Alexander Pope (actor) (1763–1835), Irish actor Alexander Pope, Jr ... (1849–1924), American sporting artist Alexander Pope (Texas politician), see Twentieth Texas Legislature and Twenty-first Texas Legislature ...
Augustan Literature - Poetry
... The entire Augustan age's poetry was dominated by Alexander Pope ... Pope had few poetic rivals, but he had many personal enemies and political, philosophical, or religious opponents, and Pope himself was quarrelsome in print ... Pope and his enemies (often called "the Dunces" because of Pope's successful satirizing of them in The Dunciad) fought over central matters of the proper ...

Famous quotes containing the words alexander pope and/or pope:

    And ten low words oft creep in one dull line:
    Alexander Pope (1688–1744)

    Beauty that shocks you, parts that none will trust,
    Wit that can creep, and pride that licks the dust.
    —Alexander Pope (1688–1744)