What is knowledge?

  • (noun): The psychological result of perception and learning and reasoning.
    Synonyms: cognition, noesis

Knowledge

Knowledge is a familiarity with someone or something, which can include facts, information, descriptions, or skills acquired through experience or education. It can refer to the theoretical or practical understanding of a subject. It can be implicit (as with practical skill or expertise) or explicit (as with the theoretical understanding of a subject); it can be more or less formal or systematic. In philosophy, the study of knowledge is called epistemology; the philosopher Plato famously defined knowledge as "justified true belief." However, no single agreed upon definition of knowledge exists, though there are numerous theories to explain it. The following quote from Bertrand Russell's "Theory of Knowledge" illustrates the difficulty in defining knowledge: "The question how knowledge should be defined is perhaps the most important and difficult of the three with which we shall deal. This may seem surprising: at first sight it might be thought that knowledge might be defined as belief which is in agreement with the facts. The trouble is that no one knows what a belief is, no one knows what a fact is, and no one knows what sort of agreement between them would make a belief true. Let us begin with belief."

Read more about Knowledge.

Some articles on knowledge:

Religious Meaning of Knowledge
... of Christianity, such as Catholicism and Anglicanism, knowledge is one of the seven gifts of the Holy Spirit ... The Old Testament's tree of the knowledge of good and evil contained the knowledge that separated Man from God "And the LORD God said, Behold, the man is become as one of us, to know ... In Thelema knowledge and conversation with one's Holy Guardian Angel is the purpose of life ...
Experiential Knowledge
... Experiential knowledge is knowledge gained through experience as opposed to a priori (before experience) knowledge ... of mind, the phrase often refers to knowledge that can only be acquired through experience, such as, for example, the knowledge of what it is like to see colours, which could not be explained to someone ... A priori knowledge is can Adam or Eve know what water feels like on their skin prior to touching it for the first time? Writer Barry Lopez writes about experiential knowledge and how it relates back to the ...
Western Esotericism - Philosophy - Initiation
... εισείτω" (which may be translated as "no person without knowledge of Geometry should get in") found in Plato's Academy ... many participants have adopted the view that access to knowledge should be as open as possible ... Zen Buddhism) in order for the passing of wisdom or knowledge to occur ...
Knowledge Worker - Knowledge Work in The 21st Century
4) says that the rise of knowledge work has actually been foreseen for years ... He points to the fact that Fritz Machlup did a lot of the early work on both knowledge as well as knowledge work roles and as early as 1958 stated that the sector was growing much faster than the rest ... Tapscott (2006) sees a strong, on-going linkage between knowledge workers and innovation, but the pace and manner of interaction have become more advanced ...
Educational Assessment - Summary Table of The Main Theoretical Frameworks
... Organ that evolved to acquire knowledge by making sense of the world ... Nature of Knowledge (epistemology) Hierarchically organized associations that present an accurate but incomplete representation of the world ... Assumes that the sum of the components of knowledge is the same as the whole ...

Famous quotes containing the word knowledge:

    Where is the Life we have lost in living?
    Where is the wisdom we have lost in knowledge?
    Where is the knowledge we have lost in information?
    —T.S. (Thomas Stearns)

    The imagination never forgets; it is a re-membering. It is not foundationless, but most reasonable, and it alone uses all the knowledge of the intellect.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    The statements of science are hearsay, reports from a world outside the world we know. What the poet tells us has long been known to us all, and forgotten. His knowledge is of our world, the world we are both doomed and privileged to live in, and it is a knowledge of ourselves, of the human condition, the human predicament.
    John Hall Wheelock (1886–1978)