Knowledge - Situated Knowledge

Situated Knowledge

Situated knowledge is knowledge specific to a particular situation.

Some methods of generating knowledge, such as trial and error, or learning from experience, tend to create highly situational knowledge. One of the main attributes of the scientific method is that the theories it generates are much less situational than knowledge gained by other methods. Situational knowledge is often embedded in language, culture, or traditions.

Knowledge generated through experience is called knowledge "a posteriori", meaning afterwards. The pure existence of a term like "a posteriori" means this also has a counterpart. In this case that is knowledge "a priori", meaning before. The knowledge prior to any experience means that there are certain "assumptions" that one takes for granted. For example if you are being told about a chair it is clear to you that the chair is in space, that it is 3D. This knowledge is not knowledge that one can "forget", even someone suffering from amnesia experiences the world in 3D. See also: a priori and a posteriori.

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Other articles related to "situated knowledge, knowledge":

Knoweth - Situated Knowledge
... Situated knowledge is knowledge specific to a particular situation ... science itself as a potential player in the creation of knowledge, resulting in a position of “modest witness” ... Some methods of generating knowledge, such as trial and error, or learning from experience, tend to create highly situational knowledge ...

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