University of San Francisco

The University of San Francisco (USF) is a Jesuit Catholic university located in San Francisco, California, United States. Founded in 1855, USF was established as the first university in San Francisco. It is the second oldest institution for higher learning in California, the tenth-oldest university of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities, and the eighth largest Jesuit university in the United States.

The school's main campus is located on a 50-acre (20 ha) setting between the Golden Gate Bridge and Golden Gate Park. Its nickname is "The Hilltop" as the campus is located at the peak of one of San Francisco's major hills. Its close historical ties with the City and County of San Francisco are reflected in the University's motto, Pro Urbe et Universitate (For the City and University). USF's Jesuit-Roman Catholic identity is rooted in the symbolic vision of St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuit order.

Read more about University Of San Francisco:  History, Organization and Administration, Student Clubs and Organizations, Student Body, Campus Dining, Athletics, Controversies, Notable Alumni and Faculty

Other articles related to "university of san francisco, san francisco, university":

William C. Mc Innes - Biography - University of San Francisco
... Father McInnes was appointed president of the University of San Francisco in 1972 ... served as president of both San Francisco and Fairfield University for four months during the transition between the two universities ... The University of San Francisco was in a deep financial crisis at the time of McInnes' arrival in 1972 ...
University Of San Francisco - Notable Alumni and Faculty
... Notable faculty members include Academy Award nominee Sam Green, director of The Weather Underground and Biology professor Paul Chien, known for his research in physiology and ecology ... Also, the University has awarded a number of people with honorary degrees ...

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