Unity of Invention

In most patent laws, unity of invention is a formal administrative requirement that must be met by a patent application to become a granted patent. Basically, a patent application can relate only to one invention or a group of closely related inventions. The purpose of this requirement is administrative, as well as financial. That is, the requirement serves to preclude the option of filing one patent application for several inventions, while paying only one set of fees (filing fee, search fee, examination fee, renewal fees, and so on). Unity of invention also makes the classification of patent documents easier.

When a patent application is objected to on the ground of a lack of unity, it may be still considered for patent protection, unlike in the case where the invention is found to be lacking novelty. A divisional application can usually be filed for the second invention, and for the further inventions, if any. Alternatively, a patent prosecutor may make a technical argument that there is unity of invention.

Other articles related to "unity of invention, invention, of inventions, inventions":

Glossary Of Patent Legal Concepts - U - Unity of Invention
... A requirement that a patent application can relate only to one invention (or to a group of inventions so linked as to form a single general inventive concept, see for ...
Unity Of Invention - Jurisdictions - United States
... patent law, applications that claim more than one distinct invention may be subject to restriction to a single invention, and the applicant may prosecute the ... A "restriction requirement" will typically present the different inventions based on the claims within the application, and the applicant may elect which invention he would prosecute ...

Famous quotes containing the words unity of, invention and/or unity:

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