UIUC College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

UIUC College Of Liberal Arts And Sciences

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) is the largest college in the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, created in 1913 through the merger of the College of Literature and Arts and the College of Science. It has nationally ranked programs in chemistry, psychology and speech communications. Its main offices are in Lincoln Hall, and most of the classes that occur on the Main Quad are LAS classes. The college differs from the other colleges on campus in that its students have an extra requirement to fulfill in order to obtain a minor. The college also used to have its own general education requirements that differed from the campus-wide list, but this was eliminated with the university-wide introduction of the UI-Integrate system.

LAS administration includes a dean, appointed by the University's Board of Trustees, several associate and assistant deans and directors for various functions. As of the end of 2005 LAS contained 54 constituent departments, more than 17,000 students and 1,300 faculty and staff. The College has published an alumni-targeted periodical, LASNews, since at least 1999.

Read more about UIUC College Of Liberal Arts And Sciences:  Alumni

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