Time - Temporal Measurement

Temporal Measurement

Temporal measurement, or chronometry, takes two distinct period forms: the calendar, a mathematical abstraction for calculating extensive periods of time, and the clock, a physical mechanism that counts the ongoing passage of time. In day-to-day life, the clock is consulted for periods less than a day, the calendar, for periods longer than a day. Increasingly, personal electronic devices display both calendars and clocks simultaneously. The number (as on a clock dial or calendar) that marks the occurrence of a specified event as to hour or date is obtained by counting from a fiducial epoch – a central reference point.

Read more about this topic:  Time

Other articles related to "temporal measurement, measurements":

Whenever - Temporal Measurement - History of Time Measurement Devices
... basis, and since 1967, the International System of Measurements bases its unit of time, the second, on the properties of caesium atoms ... smallest time interval uncertainty in direct measurements is on the order of 12 attoseconds (1.2 × 10−17 seconds), about 3.7 × 1026 Planck times ...

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