The Philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche

The Philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche is a book by H. L. Mencken, the first edition in 1907. The book covers both wider and lesser known areas of Friedrich Nietzsche's life and philosophy, notable both for its suggestion of Mencken's still-developing literary talents at the age of 27 and for its impressive detail as a book written in the United States (on only the seventh year of Nietzsche's death) considering the lack of reliable interpretations of Nietzsche in the American sphere of letters at the time; Mencken prepared for writing this book by reading all of Nietzsche's published philosophy, including several works in the original German.

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Famous quotes containing the words friedrich nietzsche, nietzsche, philosophy and/or friedrich:

    The arrogance that accompanies merit offends us even more than the arrogance of people who are lacking in merit: since merit itself offends us.
    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844–1900)

    All idealists imagine that the causes they serve are fundamentally better than any other causes in the world, and they refuse to believe that if their cause is to flourish at all it requires precisely the same foul-smelling manure that is necessary to all other human undertakings.
    —Friedrich Nietzsche (1844–1900)

    Why does philosophy use concepts and why does faith use symbols if both try to express the same ultimate? The answer, of course, is that the relation to the ultimate is not the same in each case. The philosophical relation is in principle a detached description of the basic structure in which the ultimate manifests itself. The relation of faith is in principle an involved expression of concern about the meaning of the ultimate for the faithful.
    Paul Tillich (1886–1965)

    When liberty is mentioned, we must always be careful to observe whether it is not really the assertion of private interests which is thereby designated.
    —Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770–1831)