The Oxford Companion To Philosophy

The Oxford Companion to Philosophy is a reference work in philosophy edited by Ted Honderich and published by Oxford University Press in 1995. A second edition was published in 2005 and included some 300 new entries. The new edition has over 2,200 entries and 291 contributors in 1,080 pages.

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The Oxford Companion To Philosophy - Publication History
... The Oxford Companion to Philosophy (New York Oxford University Press, 1995) ISBN 0-19-866132-0 Honderich, Ted (ed.) ... The Oxford Companion to Philosophy (Second Edition) (New York Oxford University Press, 2005) ISBN 978-0-19-926479-7 ...

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