Who is Herman Melville?

  • (noun): United States writer of novels and short stories (1819-1891).
    Synonyms: Melville

Herman Melville

Herman Melville (August 1, 1819 – September 28, 1891) was an American novelist, short story writer, essayist, and poet. He is best known for his novel Moby-Dick. His first three books gained much contemporary attention (the first, Typee, became a bestseller), but after a fast-blooming literary success in the late 1840s, his popularity declined precipitously in the mid-1850s and never recovered during his lifetime.

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Herman Melville - References and Further Reading
... War in Melville's Imagination ... Herman Melville ... A Companion to Melville Studies ...

Famous quotes containing the words herman melville and/or melville:

    These marbles, the works of the dreamers and idealists of old, live on, leading and pointing to good. They are the works of visionaries and dreamers, but they are realizations of soul, the representations of the ideal. They are grand, beautiful, and true, and they speak with a voice that echoes through the ages. Governments have changed; empires have fallen; nations have passed away; but these mute marbles remain—the oracles of time, the perfection of art.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)

    Appalling is the soul of a man! Better might one be pushed off into the material spaces beyond the uttermost orbit of our sun, than once feel himself fairly afloat in himself.
    —Herman Melville (1819–1891)