Who is Herman Melville?

  • (noun): United States writer of novels and short stories (1819-1891).
    Synonyms: Melville

Herman Melville

Herman Melville (August 1, 1819 – September 28, 1891) was an American novelist, short story writer, essayist, and poet. He is best known for his novel Moby-Dick. His first three books gained much contemporary attention (the first, Typee, became a bestseller), but after a fast-blooming literary success in the late 1840s, his popularity declined precipitously in the mid-1850s and never recovered during his lifetime.

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Herman Melville - References and Further Reading
... War in Melville's Imagination ... Herman Melville ... A Companion to Melville Studies ...

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